You Paid Too Much For Your Fireworks

Image courtesy of "graur razvan ionut" / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of “graur razvan ionut” / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I got annoyed the other day, listening to all of the fireworks ads.

Yowza! If there’s any industry who needs to “say something different” in their ads…it’s the fireworks people. You know the ones with the big red, blue, yellow, white, or black buildings?

Here’s what they tell you…

“The lowest prices, the biggest bangs, in the big (insert color) building.” yada yada yada

Then, I heard this in one of them…

“If you didn’t get your fireworks at the big blue building, you paid too much.

Then, a few minutes later, I heard another advertiser say this…

“If you didn’t get your fireworks at the big black building, you paid too much.

Now, I’m confused.

Do you know where I got MY fireworks this year? At the smaller fireworks shop that was closest to where I live. Did they have the lowest prices? I have no idea. Even if I paid a couple bucks extra for the $57 of bangers I picked up…whatever. They were really busy for about two days before the 4th of July. And I’m sure they didn’t advertise.

Listening to all the fireworks ads, I thought, “There’s no way these places are getting much ROI from these ads.” These advertisers are trying to persuade us to go to their establishment based on price mostly – which there’s no way that fireworks prices differ that much between buildings. Or they’re trying to tell us that they have the ultimate boomers and sparklies to light up the sky. I don’t believe it.

So, what would I do if I owned one of these places? My radio ads would let people know where I’m at… “Hey if you live or work near (insert location), stop by and let’s get you all set up for your Independence Day celebration.” My radio ads would also let people know that most fireworks are going to cost pretty much the same wherever you go…so you might as well shop at a place with some friendly smiles and free “big daddy” punks.” (or some kind of freebie that you give them with every purchase)

But the biggest way to make a fireworks ad go a long way is to make the WHAT YOU SAY and the WAY the ad is voiced totally different from every other fireworks ad. Don’t make it sound like the monster-truck-sunday-sunday-sunday! ads. Just tell it like it is. “Yup, we sell fireworks just like the 50 other places in this town. And the prices aren’t really that different. We’ll greet you with a smile, give you the help you need if you want it, and thank you for your business when you’re done shopping.”

Call me crazy…but that kind of message would stand out against a crowd of fireworks ads who all tend to be saying the same exact thing.

Have a great day!

Duane Christensen

Results Radio Townsquare Media – Sioux Falls

605-940-7984

My work website: http://duanechristensen.townsquareinteractive.com/

If you have questions about the cost of radio advertising, which radio stations would be a good fit, or how to get started attracting more customers, don’t be afraid to ask. I like to help good businesses take a bigger slice of the Sioux Falls market.

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